Glen Davis Ruins Tour

Glen Davis Ruins Tour

The Glen Davis Shale Oil Works, located in the Capertee Valley, was one of the largest employers in the area. Producing gasoline, the operation was an important strategic resource during the war era. In its heyday about 2,500 people lived in the township. Vertical sandstone cliffs stand guard over the crumbling vegetation covered structures lending a surreal impression.

Today, the ruins of this once thriving industry can be toured every Saturday.

Tours run every Saturday.

In the cooler months, from April to September they go from 2-4pm

During daylights savings (Oct-March) they go from 5-7pm to avoid the heat and enjoy the sunset!

The tour costs $15pp & $8 for Children under 12yrs. Cash only.

It is a walking tour, so wear covered shoes, dress for the weather and bring some water.

Contact Details

Address: ‘The Poplars’ Canobla road, Glen Davis
Phone: 0400 440 525
Email: glendavisworks@gmail.com

Glen Davis Ruins Tour

Small Arms Factory Museum

Small Arms Factory Museum

In 1912, the Government built the Small Arms Factory in Lithgow to produce weapons and small arms. The factory was the first modern manufacturing facility in Australia. The Museum presents a visual journey into the social and engineering history of this renowned facility.
Open Tues – Thurs 9:30 am to 2:00 pm, Weekends, public & school holidays 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. Groups by appointment.

Contact Details

Address: Methven St , Lithgow, 2km west of Lithgow PO
Phone: (02) 6351 4452
Website: www.lithgowsafmuseum.org.au
Email: lithgowsafmuseum@ozemail.com.au

 

 

Small Arms Factory Museum

Turon Technology Museum

Turon Technology Museum

The Turon Technology Museum displays the engines of the Industrial Revolution covering the period 1850-1950. Exhibits include the steam and internal engine and the internal combustion engine and its development.

 

Contact Details

Address: 5833 Ilford Road,Sofala NSW Australia
Phone: (+61-2) 63588434
Website: www.turontechnologymuseum.com/
Email: glengregor@bigpond.com

 

 

Turon Technology Museum

5833 Ilford Road, Sofala NSW Australia

Newnes

Newnes

Newnes was once a thriving oil shale works and town. At its peak approximately 2,000 people lived there – now only ruins are left, slowly being reclaimed by the gum forest. Interpretive signs tell the story of this once thriving industry and the workers who called Newnes home.

 

 

Newnes

Maiyingu Marragu (Blackfellows Hands)

Maiyingu Marragu (Blackfellows Hands)

The Blackfellows Hand Aboriginal Place has Aboriginal rock shelters with painted art, a teaching site and occupation site.

Blackfellows Hand Aboriginal Place was an important meeting and educational place and holds special meaning for Wiradjuri people. The place is also highly valued by the wider Aboriginal community, including Gandangara, Dharug and Dharkinjung people. The area is regarded for its richness in wild resources and its natural beauty – the vegetation, rock formations, ochres and waterfalls create an aesthetic ambience. Blackfellows Hand Aboriginal Place was also important as an occupation site and includes a men’s and a women’s area. There is a women’s birthing area in a secluded part of the complex.

Blackfellows Hand holds special meaning to Wiradjuri people because of their continuing cultural connection to the place. The site complex includes culturally significant rock shelters and stencil-art which provide a physical and spiritual link to ancestors and provide a place where traditional culture can be sustained. The area is used by the Aboriginal community as a ‘bush school room’ where young people can hear stories from Elders and learn to collect and use bush food and natural medicine

Contact Details

Address: Wolgan road Angus Place

 

Maiyingu Marragu (Blackfellows Hands)

History Avenue

Lithgow was an inevitable town, there were so many reasons for it to exist, and to exist where it is, that it just had to be.

So wrote the historian of the Small Arms Factory, Tony Griffiths. But as he himself asks, how did Lithgow, the country of the Wiradjuri and Gundungurra; Wywandy and Therabulat, become the crucible of Australian industry and ‘a transplanted pocket of Britain’s industrial black country’?

’Industrious Lithgow’ is acknowledged in the sites marked by Lithgow History Avenue. The works are the points where those transformations occurred, and where the groundwork was laid for what Lithgow would become in the 20th century, and beyond.

Some of those sites, like the Blast Furnace and the collieries, link to an energetic industrialism that is now past. Others, such as the Workmen’s Club, the Greyhound Racing Track and Eskbank House, remain part of Lithgow’s social, cultural and sporting present. As you walk through Lithgow History Avenue, or browse this site, the stories of this place, and links to people and events both locally and further afield, unfold.

A: Inch Street, Lithgow
P: 1300 760 276
E: tourism@lithgow.com 
W: www.lithgow.com/historyavenue

historyAvenue

 

Print Friendly Version of this pagePrint Get a PDF version of this webpagePDF